Utility

November 28, 2007

Finding a solution to a social problem, specifically human behavior can be trivial, yet so obscure at the same time. The solution is not derived via quantitative means alone, perhaps it has something to do with how consumers define utility.

And so I continued my search to define what is utility in terms of our product line. Is it the product itself that consumers buy, or is it satisfaction derived from the use of our products define what utility is? If it is true, then how do I connect the dots in such a way the messaging is always in tune to its utility?

3D Game

After painfully emerging from the great unknown in figuring out the latest-n-greatest GPU shaders, it seems that the next exercise would be to mimic a commercial released 3D game, simple enough to do yet not too easy to be considered nihil. New shader features implementing skin shading via subsurface scattering and cloth shading, another is hair shading where hair is affected by several forces acting on it.

Two gametypes came up right away, the first was Taekwondo (TKD), the way of fast kick and punch, made a good impression. Modeling the terrain is simple, a scene having a place where two opponents fight. The actor having several animated sequences, often derived from standard Taekwondo forms. The objective is to implement said features to an actor with proper skin shading, good enough to render realistic skin showing the oily (sweaty) part of skin. Facial expressions are tackled as well, making sure the proper vertices are shaded to show the correct expression. Cloth shading referring to the kimono (Grandmaster Uniform) should show cloth tension and gravity. The mechanics of hair will also be studied and implemented if possible, yes hair mechanics is hard.

The second gametype is to basically resurrect my favorite Apple II game that we played, known as Karateka. This is basically a fallback of the first, in the case TKD turns out to be complicated.

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Marketing From The Bottom

November 21, 2007

I was reading a book yesterday how advertisers lament the current situation. In it he states that the days of forcing Joe Schmoe to watch a series of ads while lying down on a comfy sofa is now over. Joe Schmoe is not lying down watching the TV, he is now sitting on his chair in front of a computer connected to the Internet. Joe Schmoe has taken control of viewing content and now has power to turn-off messages he doesn’t like. “Oh yeah, you marketroids are done now. You’re just a click of a button away.”

I remember in the class, when agricultural economy turned to manufacturing, marketing evolved to meet new challenges of having to deal with huge quantities, surplusses to be exact. Selling in conjuction with identifying the buyer became a little bit complicated, with marketing having to satisfy not only one but several types of buyers. That’s only one aspect of it, not including geography which is another facet.

Now, in this age of information and service-based economy, a new type of behavior is rapidly growing to the unsuspecting marketing guy, like a throbbing green blob in a petri-dish. And this behavior is the one most advertisers fear of, power has shifted to the side of consumer who are now in control of data, the (over) abundance of information has changed the field. Overflowing rivers of information coursing through the network, straight into Joe Schmoe’s tiny brain is like a bolt of lightning hitting the advertisers.

Ka-Boom!

The place littered with pieces of old junk.

“What a disaster. Oh my gaawwwwd. Quick, call the dumpster man now!”

With that fact already in place, the guys at the marketing department came up with a new way of reaching consumers, known as bottom-up approach.

And then…

Well, sit back and relax, enjoy. While I go for now to finish the Accounting assignment.